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Workshops

Discover the range of workshops we will offer at the congress, each designed to engage, educate, and inspire.

Workshops


Accepted Workshops

We are delighted to present our list of accepted Workshops for ISPAH Congress 2024. Please click on each symposium to view detailed information, including speakers, schedules, and topics covered.
Workshop

ISPAH Early Career Network workshop

Purpose: Provide early career practitioners, researchers and policy makers attending the congress with networking and capacity building opportunities to enhance their congress experience and foster professional development Learning Objective 1: Facilitate networking opportunities and build collaborative relationships between congress attendees The workshop will involve a speed networking activity between early career professionals that will enable brief interactions between researchers, practitioners and policy makers in physical activity and health. Learning Objective 2: Develop/build on skills in peer review The workshop will also involve a capacity building activity led by Melody Ding (JPAH Co-Editor in Chief) and Loretta DiPetro on the topic of peer review. This activity will sit in line with ISPAH’s current collaboration with JPAH in regard to the Bill Kohl Peer Review Academy. This activity will be a unique opportunity for early career professionals to learn from highly experienced researchers in physical activity and health. Learning Objective 3: Facilitate interaction with senior/more experienced professionals and foster confidence and communication for effective networking and professional development The final workshop activity will involve a Q&A panel with experienced professionals in physical activity and health. This activity will use a ‘living library’/ ‘walking Q&A’ approach that fosters the attendees’ confidence in communicating with fellow early career professionals as well as more experienced/senior researchers and provide an opportunity to gain insights into topics/practices relevant for their own professional and career development. Target Audience: Early career professionals attending the ISPAH congress. Whilst no specific criteria will be applied in regard to a time frame since completing relevant studies, attendees will be encouraged to self-reflect on their eligibility for taking part in this workshop. Organization/Method of Presentation: This workshop will include small group discussions and 1:1 interactions alongside brief ‘mini-lectures/presentations’. A variety of approaches will be used to enable all attendees to meaningfully engage.

Submitting Author

Kim Straun

Population Group

Not Applicable

Study Type

Other

Setting

Not Applicable
Workshop

Sedentary behaviour, from physiology to guidelines.

Purpose: The purpose of this workshop is to discuss the impacts of sedentary behaviour on key physiological outcomes and identify the need for targeted sedentary behaviour guidelines in different chronic conditions. Learning objectives: The workshop will highlight the mixed evidence on physiological responses to sedentary behaviour and how interruptions to these prolonged bouts of sedentary activities can improve specific physiological responses. The workshop will also cover preliminary findings from an ongoing systematic review focusing on sedentary behaviour patterns in those living with different chronic conditions. The workshop will incorporate group discussions and task-based learning, with a focus on physiological responses in different chronic conditions and developing targeted guidelines for specific chronic conditions. The following learning objectives will be covered in the workshop: 1. Understand the impacts of sedentary behaviour on pertinent physiological data on the central nervous system, musculoskeletal system, respiratory and circulatory systems, immune and inflammatory responses, body weight and energy balance, and intermediate metabolism. 2. Learn about experimental models employed in interrupting sedentary behaviour and the acute and long terms effects of these models on physiological responses. 3. Identify gaps in the literature around sedentary behaviour patterns in different chronic conditions that guide recommendations. Further, attendees will participate in group-based tasks that aim to develop more targeted sedentary behaviour guidelines for those living with specific chronic conditions. Target audience: The target audience will have an interest in sedentary behaviour and chronic conditions.

Submitting Author

Paul Mackie

Population Group

People with chronic conditions

Study Type

Policy (e.g. policy or guideline development)

Setting

Whole System
Workshop

Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance Global Matrix 5.0 Preparation Workshop

Purpose: To discuss planned modifications and provide a tutorial and guidance to countries/jurisdictions that are interested in participating in the Global Matrix 5.0. Learning Objective 1: Provide an overview of the Report Card development process. Learning Objective 2: Review the definitions and benchmarks for the 10 key physical activity indicators used in the Global Matrix project and discuss modifications. Learning Objective 3: Propose a methodology for the Global Matrix 5.0 with respect to including elements of equity, diversity, and inclusion data (e.g., stratification of data by sex, disability, other under-represented groups). Learning Objective 4: Discuss the challenges, timelines, funding, mentorship, and benefits of participating in the Global Matrix 5.0. Target Audience: Researchers, leaders, practitioners, decision-makers from countries/jurisdictions interested in participating in the Global Matrix 5.0. Organization and Method of Presentation: Using standardized definitions and benchmarks, the Active Health Kids Global Alliance (AHKGA)’s Global Matrix initiative, follows a transparent and harmonized approach in developing Country Report Cards. Each country/jurisdiction Report Card assigns grades to ten common indicators related to physical activity for children and youth. The Report Card development methodology empowers teams of experts within each country/jurisdiction to follow the harmonized process and evaluate the best available evidence before assigning grades to each of the ten indicators of physical activity, following a standardized grading rubric. Since 2014, AHKGA has held 4 iterations of the Global Matrix with increasing numbers, diversity in development indices, and geographical locations of participating countries/jurisdictions. Each iteration of the Global Matrix has typically been followed by an evaluation and modifications to improve the rigor in and harmonization of the process for future initiatives. Planning for future Global Matrices is deliberate, and involves comprehensive proactive consultations. Led by AHKGA, this interactive workshop will combine didactic short presentations, guided and open brainstorming, small group discussions, and question and answers.

Submitting Author

Mark Tremblay

Population Group

Children, Adolescents, People with chronic conditions, Disadvantaged groups

Study Type

Other

Setting

School, Community, Sport, Family, Transport, Whole System
Workshop

Leveraging Media for Physical Activity Advocacy: Maximising Population Impact

PURPOSE: This hands-on workshop aims to equip participants with effective skills, strategies and tools for using various media platforms – spanning print, digital and social – to advocate for physical activity. It focuses on developing skills and knowledge to enable impactful knowledge translation and advocacy, informed by physical activity message-framing research. LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 1. Physical Activity Message Content: An introduction to evidence-based effective physical activity messaging (including type of information, framing, use of targeting, language and tone) is crucial. Participants will first hear about evidence-based message content and will be introduced to the Physical Activity Messaging Framework (PAMF); a practical tool for creating physical activity messages. 2. Understanding Media: Participants will learn about the opportunities and unique characteristics of different media platforms (e.g. print, digital, social) for promoting physical activity. This includes understanding audience demographics, content creation, and message delivery tailored to each platform. Participants will discuss which message frames may suit which platforms and audiences. Evaluation methods for different media will also be discussed. 3. Practising Media: Attendees will be guided in developing messages for different media from their research/practice/policy. They will practise this in different formats (e.g., mock TV interviews) TARGET AUDIENCE: This workshop is ideal for professionals who are interested in using media as a tool for knowledge translation and/or to advocate for increased physical activity. It is also suitable for those looking to enhance their media communication skills in the context of public health promotion more broadly. ORGANISATION AND METHOD OF PRESENTATION: The workshop will be organized into three main segments, aligning with the learning objectives. Each segment will include a mix of short presentations, interactive discussions, and practical exercises. Case studies of good and bad practice will be discussed. The workshop will emphasize practical application and participant engagement to accommodate diverse learning styles.

Submitting Author

Matthew ‘Tepi’ Mclaughlin

Population Group

Not Applicable

Study Type

Practice

Setting

School, Workplace, Community, Sport, Family, Healthcare, Transport, Whole System
Workshop

Improving practice and evaluation of physical activity mass media campaigns

Proposed by: Adrian Bauman 1 , Juana Willumsen 2, Robyn Landais 2 1 School of Public Health, Sydney University, Australia 2 World Health Organization, Geneva (Physical Activity Unit, Department of Health Promotion) Purpose: to increase skills in physical activity mass media campaigns, understanding good practices in planning, delivery and evaluation Learning objectives 1. To understand the role of regional or national mass media campaigns in an overall population physical activity strategy and how they fit into the WHO GAPPA systems approach. 2. To discuss the planning stages and message development phases required for physical activity mass media campaigns. 3. To share examples of effective physical activity campaigns [participants encouraged to bring examples of good campaigns to discuss for 3-5 mins each]; additional good practice physical activity campaigns will be discussed by the workshop presenters. 4. To understand the development of WHO communications toolkit for physical activity, and the aspects of good / recommended practice and evaluation Abstract Mass media campaigns have been used widely in public health and have been used to promote physical activity for over 50 years. The use of campaigns is recommended in the ISPAH ‘8 Best investments for physical activity’ and in the WHO Global Action Plan for Physical Activity but are intended as part of a comprehensive systems approach to promoting physical activity. This workshop will provide an update on bet practices in planning, delivering and evaluating physical activity campaigns, and will introduce the WHO toolkit for good practice in physical activity mass media campaigns, in the context of the WHO strategy on “Tackling NCDs and other recommended interventions”. Workshop participants will discuss examples of campaigns from across the world, as well as recent developments in mass communications, including the use of digital and social media to amplify campaign effects. ======================

Submitting Author

Adrian Bauman

Population Group

Not Applicable

Study Type

Practice

Setting

Whole System
Workshop

Physical activity research in Mexico: Can the ideals of participatory-research be upheld in HIC-LMIC partnerships?

Background: Multi-national research collaborations dedicated to addressing physical inactivity in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) offer a rich opportunity for transcultural knowledge exchange. The establishment and maintenance of authentic research collaborations across multiple countries are both challenging and rewarding. Purpose: To equip participants with successful strategies, techniques, and culturally relevant practices for initiating and sustaining multi-national collaborations for implementation science research that align with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to create a globally equitable future. Content Drawing on our 20-year collaboration that includes researchers, physicians, public health practitioners, and policymakers from Canada, the United States, and Mexico, we will share lessons learned from our efforts to address physical inactivity in Mexico. Examples will illustrate the application of community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology; the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences’ (CIOMS) International Ethical Guidelines for Health-related Research; and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Ethical and equitable approaches to avoid neocolonial practices will be explicitly highlighted. Learning Objectives: After completing this workshop, attendees will: 1) understand how to apply CBPR principles to initiate and maintain authentic international research collaborations 2) understand how to conduct ethical research in low-resource settings 3) understand how to apply the CFIR to investigate innovations in transcultural contexts Target Audience: Researchers seeking to establish and maintain authentic partnerships to conduct implementation science research across nations that differ in affluence and culture. Organization and Method: Participants in this workshop will receive classroom style training and interactive demonstrations along with brainstorming activities and small group work to master skills to engage relevant stakeholders, enhancing reciprocal cultural competence, identifying collaboration strengths and weaknesses along with areas of opportunity and threats to productivity, and influencing policy. Activities will draw on applying CBPR principles, CIOMS ethical guidelines and CFIR constructs, exploring cultural myths and stereotypes, and case study examples.

Submitting Author

Lucie Lévesque

Population Group

Not Applicable

Study Type

Other

Setting

Whole System
Workshop

Active environments and vital cities: ‘Walkshop’ with lessons from the Low Countries

Purpose: Sharing the most recent knowledge about and lessons learned on active friendly environments from two countries with the rest of the world. The Knowledge Centre for Sport & Physical Activity Netherlands and Vital Cities from HOWEST (Belgium) will go into the theory behind active environments, building blocks and design principles for creating an active environment. We will present our most recent knowledge on the topic and why inter-sectoral collaboration is important in creating an active environment. The workshop (180 minutes) will be a combination of an interactive presentation on site and a ‘walkshop’ through the neighbourhood, performing an active environment scan together with the workshop leaders. During the walkshop, we will also reflect on how different user groups use and experience the environment, to give everyone equal opportunities to be active in public space. Afterwards, we will have a group discussion about the results of the scan, and reflect on the learnings taken from both the theoretical and practical learnings from the workshop. Learning Objective 1: Participants will be able to describe the basic concepts of an active environment based on the Physical Activity Friendly Environment Model from the Knowledge Centre for Sport & Physical Activity NL and the concepts of hardware, software and orgware in this context. Learning Objective 2: Participants will learn how you can create an inclusive environment, making sure that everybody can participate equally, both in the design, as well as in the use of the public space for sports and activities. Learning Objective 3: Participants will go outside and learn how to perform a scan of the neighbourhood on how active and inclusive the environment is, with the tools presented by Vital Cities and the Knowledge Centre. Target Audience: Everyone who is interested in creating active environments and vital cities through sport and activity.

Submitting Author

Jacqueline Kronenburg

Population Group

Most inactive

Study Type

Other

Setting

Community
Workshop

Physical activity policy implementation: Measures, methods and means of evaluation to advance the field.

Purpose: This workshop aims to share the learnings from the Policy Evaluation Network (PEN; https://www.jpi-pen.eu/), a four million, seven country, 28-Research Centre project in Europe. It will provide attendees with knowledge, skills and experience of how to use PEN’s tools and measures to conduct an evaluation of national physical activity policy implementation. Public policies are an increasingly important upstream component of physical activity (PA) promotion. They have the capacity to build enabling contexts for PA, thus influencing whole populations. However, the systematic evaluation of public policies in PA is poorly understood. The PEN project developed a standardized assessment tool, a capacity building methodology and an eight-step process, namely the Physical Activity Environment Policy Index (or PA-EPI). This process provides guidance on how countries can monitor their PA policy implementation status, undertake a comparison to international best practice, and learn how to identify implementation gaps and prioritise feasible recommendations for improvement. Learning Objectives By the end of this workshop, attendees will have: 1. Enhanced their knowledge on recent developments in PA policy globally. 2. Gained a greater understanding of a range of PA policy evaluation and monitoring tools and their usefulness. 3. Experienced first-hand the PA-EPI tool designed to assess the extent of implementation of national government policies and actions to promote PA. 4. Reflect on workshop learnings to inform and stimulate future research and practice in this field. Target Audience: This workshop will be of benefit to both novice and experienced researchers, policymakers, and practitioners. Organization and Method of Presentation: This workshop will involve a mix of presentations, small group discussion, data analysis and co-creation. Attendees will gain practical experience of using the PA-EPI to evaluate the implementation of PA policy in a hypothetical country. This will ensure full understanding of the process, its potential and relevance to your situation.

Submitting Author

Catherine Woods

Population Group

Not Applicable

Study Type

Policy (e.g. policy or guideline development)

Setting

Whole System
Workshop

Developing and evaluating mobile health interventions that target movement behaviours

Purpose: This workshop aims to increase awareness and understanding of the opportunities and challenges related to mobile health (mHealth) interventions that target movement behaviours and build capacity around developing scalable and effective mHealth interventions. Participants will have the opportunity to design their own mHealth intervention. Learning Objectives: LO1: Apply a framework for the development of digital behaviour change interventions, which considers technical and behavioural perspectives. LO2: Use a behaviour change intervention ontology to identify relevant technology-delivered behavioural change techniques and understand the underpinning mechanisms of action. LO3: Understand the concept of just-in-time interventions and discuss opportunities of using real-time data from wearable and environmental sensors to trigger context-sensitive intervention prompts LO4: Discuss the data-related challenges of technology-delivered interventions including access, collection, storing, use and management of data streams. Target Audience: Individuals who design, development, implement, and/or evaluate technology-delivered movement behaviour interventions. Organization and Method of Presentation: Presentation 1: Participants will be introduced to a framework that can be used to guide the development of an mHealth intervention. Key steps in the development process will be considered, including complex intervention development frameworks, user-centred design, behaviour change theory, and agile methodology. Presentation 2: Participants will learn how to use a behavioural change intervention ontology to identify relevant behaviour change techniques and related mechanisms of action that may lead to effective mHealth intervention design. Presentation 3: Participants will be introduced to rules that govern triggering of various interactions within an mHealth intervention, with a focus on context-sensitive intervention prompts using data from wearable and environmental sensors. Practical activity: Case studies will be discussed before participants design and present their own mHealth intervention. Discussion: Group discussions will be facilitated around the opportunities and limitations of mHealth interventions in the context of movement behaviours with a focus on data considerations (from technical and scientific perspectives).

Submitting Author

Jacqueline Mair

Population Group

Not Applicable

Study Type

Method development

Setting

Not Applicable
Workshop

Implementation of physical activity interventions in healthcare practice: share and learn!

Duration: 180 minutes Purpose: To improve comprehension of the implementation of physical activity (PA) interventions in healthcare practice and to exchange experiences. Learning Objectives: Learning Objective 1: To known implementation strategies and be able to apply them in healthcare practice. Learning Objective 2: To learn about other initiatives regarding implementation of PA interventions. Learning Objective 3: To enhance your understanding of potential (creative) methods for implementation research. Learning Objective 4: To be capable of developing an action plan for the implementation of a PA intervention. Target Audience: All professionals and researchers with interest in implementation research. Organization and Method of Presentation: Two cases of PA implementation will be presented briefly, with focus on lessons learned. Case 1: Implementation of the Keep Moving Support Tool in physiotherapy treatment. The tool supports healthcare professionals to develop client centered interventions that consider the clients contextual factors and aligns these with effective Behavior Change Techniques (BCT’s) to achieve sustained change in PA. A step-by-step approach for implementation was employed. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) and ERIC strategies were used along with several creative methods. Case 2: An interactive PA tool ‘Walk in the ParQ’ was implemented in a nursing home for elderly by healthcare professionals with the aim to increase PA in daily routine. Participative action research was conducted to evaluate this interactive PA route with target group, professionals and stakeholders, resulting in a roadmap for implementation. After the presentation of these cases, we will gather methods used for implementation research with all participants in a brainstorm exercise. Subsequently, small group discussions will provide the opportunity to share experiences regarding the implementation of PA interventions in your specific context or setting. Finally, under the guidance of the implementation experts you’ll work on your own case and make an action plan for implementation.

Submitting Author

Joan Dallinga

Population Group

Adults, Older Adults, People with chronic conditions, Most inactive

Study Type

Other

Setting

Healthcare
Workshop

Designing quality movement experiences with a physical literacy lens

Purpose: Present and explore how to use the holistic view of human development, as illustrated by physical literacy, as an innovation tool to create and facilitate activities and physical environments that increase participants intent to value and getting involved in physical activity. Learning Objectives: Participants will gain insight into the global approaches being taken by physical literacy advocates to: – design activities in different contexts that at the same time develop competence, confidence and intrinsic motivation to move. – design and creation of active environments – places where people have permission to play, to explore, to create and to connect with themselves, with others and with physical activity. Learning objective 1: Participants will explore and share the core components and essential elements of physical literacy enhanced places and spaces. Learning objective 2: Participants will explore and feel a physical literacy enriched activity, discuss the insights behind it and the potential value in aspects of health, health equity, equality and skill acquisition (physical, social, emotional and cognitive). Learning objective 3: The session will also give the opportunity to reflect on how quality movement experiences can nurture the 23 skills in the sustainable concept of “Innerdevelopment Goals” framework. This will clarify the connection between meaningful physical activities and the global sustainable development goals. Target audience: Anyone who considers it necessary to use a new approach to increase physical activity. Organization and Method of Presentation: The presenters will introduce and facilitate innovative movement opportunities and physical activities, including underlying insights and theories, and let the participants try some of them out, and compare them to traditional ones. The participants will be invited to be part of co-creative physical activities, adjusted to fit all interests and all capacities, as well as invited in to small-group discussions.

Submitting Author

Tom Englén

Population Group

Not Applicable

Study Type

Practice

Setting

Whole System
Workshop

Master Thigh-Worn Accelerometry: Dive into ActiPASS & Motus for Effective Large-Scale Data Collection and Data-processing

Thigh worn accelerometers is preferred for obtaining accurate information on physical behaviors 24/7. Despite the decreased cost of these devices, managing the participant burden and the substantial workload for researchers overseeing data collection and processing remain challenging. To address this, we have developed the ActiPASS and Motus methods. ActiPASS is a tool developed for ProPASS (https://www.propassconsortium.org), a consortium that harmonizes, and pool data globally from cohort studies. ActiPASS streamlines offline processing of vast volumes of raw accelerometer data from various brands. (https://github.com/Ergo-Tools/ActiPASS). Motus is a system that leverages cutting-edge wearable and wireless technology. Through the Motus smartphone app, it enables self-monitoring of physical behaviors via a thigh-worn accelerometer linked to the cloud. Remote monitoring becomes seamless with an intuitive administration interface, reducing the load on both participants and researchers. The objectives in this workshop include learning: 1. step-by-step process of attaching the accelerometers used with ActiPASS and Motus methods 2. fundamental principles behind the algorithms deriving the physical behaviours (like sit, stand, walk, run, bicycle, stairwalk, lie and sleep) from thigh worn accelerometers 3. how to use ActiPASS and Motus methods for processing data 4. how to perform a quality check of their results and critically evaluate their results. Target Audience: Researchers and students interested in exploring the benefits of thigh-worn accelerometry, whether or not they have their own data. The focus is on learning how to collect and process data using this technology At the end of the workshop, you’ll be equipped to evaluate ActiPASS and Motus for current and future projects, unlocking their potential in your work.

Submitting Author

Peter Johansson

Population Group

Children, Adolescents, Adults, Older Adults

Study Type

Measurement or surveillance

Setting

Workplace, Community, Family, Healthcare, Transport, Whole System

Pre-conference workshops will happen on the day before the conference opening, i.e. on October 28. The workshops with take place in a location near the congress venue.

Workshops can be either 90 or 180 minutes, as preferred by the submitters. A limited number of workshop proposals can be accepted. All presenters of accepted workshops are required to pay for their own registration fees (and accommodation and travel costs where applicable). ISPAH will not waive these fees.

The workshop objectives should support participants in the development of skills and knowledge in an innovative area of interest.

Abstracts for workshops should be no longer than 300 words (not including authors or title) and follow the guidelines below as closely as possible. The title should be brief, no more than 15 words.

Notes: The Chair will need to include the names, affiliations, and contact details of all workshop presenters at the time of submission. Please be sure to include all authors so that they are listed in the abstract that will be included in the conference programme.

The following details are required in each abstract submission (300 word maximum) for workshops:

Title: The title should represent the overall topic area being discussed.

Purpose: State the primary purpose of the workshop.

Learning Objectives: Include an overall workshop description along with the key learning objectives (ideally at least three learning objectives). The learning objectives should be written with an action verb describing what the participant will learn or be able to do upon the completion of the workshop.

Learning Objective 1: Please include short description

Learning Objective 2: Please include short description

Learning Objective 3: Please include short description

Target Audience: Include a brief summary of the target audience for this workshop.

Organization and Method of Presentation: Include a brief summary of the main topics/ideas that will be discussed and the method of presentation/discussion (e.g., practical application of techniques, small group discussion, co-creation, sharing circles, case studies and demonstration, problem-solving) to accommodate different learning styles.